How to watch the shows that won big at the Golden Globes

The Golden Globes is, outside of the Emmys, television’s most significant prize-giving  event and, not unexpectedly, streaming services and cable TV cleaned up while traditional broadcast shows went away with exactly one (well-deserved) award.

Here’s what won and how you can watch:

Best drama series went to the first season of the Netflix series “The Crown,” all of which is currently streaming on the ever-increasingly-powerful service.  (Claire Foy also won best actress in a drama for her role as Queen Elizabeth in the show.)

 (l-r) Keith Standfield as Darius, Golden Globe winner Donald Glover as Earnest Marks, Brian Tyree Henry as Alfred Miles in "Atlanta" (Guy D'Alema/FX_
(l-r) Keith Standfield as Darius, Golden Globe winner Donald Glover as Earn Marks, Brian Tyree Henry as Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles in “Atlanta” (Guy D’Alema/FX)

 

The stunning first season of the FX comedy “Atlanta” won for best comedy, and its insanely talented creator Donald Glover (aka Childish Gambino) picked up a best actor in a comedy trophy.

Sadly, the whole thing can not longer be seen on the FXNow app (cable login required). Nor can “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” which won best television movie or miniseries. (Sarah Paulson won best actress in a miniseries in her role as Marcia Clarke for “O.J.,” for which she also picked up an Emmy). Both can now be purchased on Amazon.

The AMC miniseries “The Night Manager,” based on the John le Carré novel of the same name, picked up three acting awards: best actor in a mini for Tom Hiddleston, best supporting actress for the perpetually underrated Olivia Colman and best supporting actor for Hugh Laurie. The totally excellent thriller can be found on Amazon Prime.

Amazon is also the home of “Goliath,” for which Billy Bob Thornton picked up lead actor in a drama.

"black-ish" (ABC)
“black-ish” (ABC)

And last but very much not least, we come to Tracee Ellis Ross, who won best actress in a comedy or musical for her role as Dr. Rainbow Johnson in the wonderful ABC comedy “Black-ish,” which deserves absolutely every viewer it gets. It’s in the middle of its third season, and its writing has never been stronger. Check out all three seasons on Hulu.

RELATED: Red carpet photos from the 74th annual Golden Globes

RELATED: Photos from the 74th annual Golden Globes

 

Mindy Kaling at the Texas Teen Book Festival: “I think I was just a friendly, chubby kid”

In case you missed it: on Saturday Mindy Kaling gave a one-on-one interview with Sarah Pitre of Alamo Drafthouse and Forever YA Book Club for the Texas Teen Book Festival, hosted by St. Edward’s University.

The writer and star of Hulu’s The Mindy Project talked about childhood influences, the start of her writing career, and her upcoming role in the film adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time, directed by Ava DuVernay. When asked to describe her teenage self as a YA protagonist, Kaling said that at fourteen years old, she was bookish, awkward, and an underdog.

“[I was] painfully shy, acneic, overweight–to the extent where you’re not worried about health but just shy of that,” Kaling listed. “I think I was just a friendly, chubby kid.”

Kaling also said she was ignored in school, which encouraged her writing abilities.

“I liked talking to people but was largely overlooked in school, so I found solace in books,” Kaling said. “I think fairly early on, when I was being ignored largely, I was left alone a lot because both my parents worked. You could either read or you could write. I think I always knew I wanted to write but it wasn’t until I was eight or nine years old that I learned that you could write for television.”

Kaling, who was at the festival promoting her books Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) and Why Not Me? said that when she was younger she started writing comedy skits for SNL.

“I was starting to write some short plays,” Kaling said. “I’ve realized that writing fiction felt, for me, so different, and so much harder than writing dialogue, which I’ve been doing for the past fifteen years. The reason I like writing essays so much is because I feel like I’m talking to a friend.”

When asked about the glamour of Hollywood, Kaling credited The Office for teaching her about the aesthetics of writing television shows.

“In order to find happiness for me, I just have to find situations where what is real is beautiful,” Kaling said. “In The Office, the most important thing is not everyone being beautiful. I like comedies where nobody cares about looks, where being funny is what’s most important.”

Kaling said that when she was a teenager, the book that affected her the most was House of Mirth by Edith Warton, and it still influences her writing choices today.

“I went through the whole Jane Austin canon, and then after that Charlotte Bronte, and then I read House of Mirth,” Kaling said. “In this book there was this lead who was stuck in her time, but also wanted selfish things and discovered her sexuality. Especially looking at all of these shows nowadays, that character’s still in my mind. I love flawed characters.”

Kaling also talked about her upbringing and how it influences her material.

“[My parents] were extremely strict but also very chatty. So I couldn’t go out or do a lot of things, but we’d sit inside and watch episodes of Seinfeld and talk a lot about why we liked them. Or we would listen to music on long car rides to Niagara Falls and talk about why it worked for us…people think the best quality in children is being expressive. In my house, it was much more important to be perceptive.”

“What is so cool is that the director, Ava DuVernay, has picked a really inclusive cast,” Kaling said. “And there’s a really interesting thing where she doesn’t want to say ‘diverse’, she thinks that’s a word that turns people off and doesn’t represent the same thing as ‘inclusive’, which I really agree with.”

When asked for more details about the movie, Kaling teased that the movie would be set in Los Angeles.

“If you’ve read the book, you know it takes place in England. If you’re not Caucasian, you feel like you love the book but you feel outside of it, like you’re admiring it in a really anthropological way,” Kaling said. “What’s great about [DuVernay’s] interpretation is just how inclusive it is.”

The Emmys: 20 thoughts on who was nominated, who should win and who was snubbed

  1. The nominations for the 68th Emmy Awards are out and, to the surprise of exactly nobody, “Game of Thrones” picked up 23 nods.
  2. The completely amazing “The People v. O.J. Simpson” picked up 22 noms,  “Fargo” has 18 and “Veep” has 17 nominations.
  3. It’s outstanding to see “The Americans” and “Mr. Robot,” the two smartest live action series on TV, given best drama nods. Even with the 23 nominations, I am not completely convinced “Game of Thrones” should be there for season five, which I found a little rambling (thought I thought this season was just stunningly entertaining). “Better Call Saul,” another best drama hopeful, is often brilliant. I would love to see either “The Americans” “or “Mr. Robot” win.
  4. Unlike the drama nods, nearly half of the best comedy nods – “Master of None” (Hulu), “Transparent” (Amazon) and “Unbreakable Kimmy Schimdt” (Netflix) – are streaming shows.
  5. Also in best comedy, the often excellent and usually family-friendly”Black-ish” (which my kids love) and “Modern Family” (which should be put out of its misery rather than be nominated again) are on ABC; “Silicon Valley” and “Veep,” both terrific, are on HBO.
    Rami Malek in 'Mr. Robot' (Peter Kramer/USA Network)
    Rami Malek in ‘Mr. Robot’ (Peter Kramer/USA Network)

     

  6. So much for comedy programming on CBS, Fox or NBC. Ouch.
  7. For my money, the lead actor in a drama Emmy should go to Rami Malek (“Mr Robot”) in a walk. His performance is like nothing else on television — complex, weird and 21st century.
  8. Matthew Rhys and his perma-frown are essential parts of what make “The Americans” great. Nominees Kyle Chandler, Bob Odenkirk, Liev Schreiber and Kevin Spacey are all excellent, but Malek and Rhys feel like something new.
  9. As far as actor in a comedy goes, Jeffrey Tambor is obviously brilliant in “Transparent, but he’s already feted (and the drama often works better than the comedy on that show).  As much as I like Anthony Anderson and Aziz Ansari, I am pulling for Thomas Middleditch’s note-perfect programmer on “Silicon Valley.” (I am mystified as to why T.J. Miller didn’t get a best supporting actor in a comedy nod for “Silicon Valley.” His bluster is brilliant.)
  10. The lead actress in a drama category is a game of inches: Keri Russell’s mission-first vibe on “The Americans” becomes more complicated by the second. (Also, will she ever stop doing laundry?) But Tatiana Maslany on “Orphan Black” is a tour de force, every episode, where, as various clones of her character, she is often playing three or four or five parts an episode. It’s nuts.
    In this image released by FX, Matthew Rhys, left, and Keri Russell appear in a scene from "The Americans." On Thursday, July 14, 2016, Rhys was nominated for outstanding actor in a drama series for his role in the series. The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be broadcast live on ABC beginning at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. (Craig Blankenhorn/FX via AP)
    Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell both got acting nods for “The Americans.” (Craig Blankenhorn/FX via AP)

     

  11. Lead actress in a comedy should probably go to Julia Louis-Dreyfus for “Veep,” but here’s the thing:
  12. Laurie Metcalfe should be a mortal lock not for HBO’s “Getting On,” the comedy for which she was nominated here, but for for her astounding turn in Louis CK’s genuinely groundbreaking “Horace and Pete,” which is very much not a comedy.
  13. The Playhouse-90-on-the-web format of “Horace and Pete” felt exciting and daring, one of the few times this past year that something appeared in front of your eyeballs that made anything seem possible.
  14. Metcalfe, who was terrific for years on “Roseanne,” also picked up a nomination for a guest spot on “The Big Bang Theory.” Three noms in three different acting categories is an Emmy first. She certainly deserves it.
  15. Interesting to see the total absence of David Simon’s HBO mini “Show Me A Hero” from the limited series category, whose nominees included the Austin-filmed “American Crime”; “Fargo,” from Austin’s Noah Hawley; “The Night Manager”; “The People vs. O.J. Simpson”; and the History Channel’s remake of “Roots.”
  16. As much as I loved “Fargo,” whose second season was cracklingly alive, my vote has to go to “The People vs. O.J. Simpson,” which managed to be dramatic, funny, timely, campy, dark and incredibly weird, often all at the same time.
  17. Speaking of, Courtney B. Vance should win lead actor in a movie or limited series for embodying but not copying Johnnie Cochran in “The People.” He is up against Cuba Gooding Jr. in this category as well.

    In this image released by FX, Sarah Paulson portrays Marcia Clark, left, and Sterling K. Brown portrays Christopher Darden in a scene from "The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." On Thursday, July 14, 2016, Brown was nominated for outstanding supporting actor in a limited series or movie for his role. The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be broadcast live on ABC beginning at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. (Ray Mickshaw/FX via AP)
    Sarah Paulson portrays Marcia Clark, left, and Sterling K. Brown portrays Christopher Darden in a scene from “The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.”(Ray Mickshaw/FX via AP)
  18. I feel exactly the same way about Sarah Paulson as Marcia Clark in “The People.” In fact, it would be kind of great to see “The People” sweep the acting for limited series or movie.
  19. Most unjust snub? “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” one of the year’s breakout shows, wasn’t nominated for variety/talk, while “Jimmy Kimmel Live” and
  20. One sentimental favorite: I would love love love to see Jonathan Banks finally grab a supporting actor win for his incredible performance as Mike Ehrmantraut on “Better Call Saul,” a prize he should have won for the same character on “Breaking Bad.” 

The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be hosted by Jimmy Kimmel and broadcast live Sept. 18 on ABC. Check out a list of all the nominees from the most prominent categories.


Welcome to Check It Out. Feel free to leave your shoes on, it’s cool.

So, there will be a lot of different stuff going on in this blog:

All sorts of television – the great, the not-so-great and “Vinyl,” a show that should really be called

The correct title. (Thank you to the brilliant David W Alexander Parker for creating this image)
The correct title. (Thank you to the brilliant David W Alexander Parker for creating this image)

Movie things that don’t fit in the Austin Movie Blog (cool home video releases, what’s new in streaming, supplementary notes about movie reviews or maybe some of the angry trolling I got about this thing.)

Music things that aren’t quite right for the Austin Music Source (cool band I find on, say, Bandcamp, what I’ve been listening to, etc.)

Books things that might not be right for the Reader (including comics, comics and more comics).

Cultural detritus from around the Web. A place to discuss all that is new and interesting in culture, or old and interesting in culture, popular or otherwise.

And if I use the word thinkpiece, please feel free to send me a strongly worded note.

A word about the blog name:

I thought I was making a horrible pun that maybe three people would get, as in

a) this blog I would love for you, the reader, to in fact check out, and

b) it is the catchphrase, more or less, of one John Brannon, one of the greatest punk frontmen who ever lived and a man possessed of a truly singular vocal roar. He fronted Negative Approach, one of the three or four best first-gen American hardcore punk bands; Laughing Hyenas, a truly mighty indie rock force back when indie rock could mean everything from the Jesus Lizard to Heavenly to Yo La Tengo to Fugazi; and Easy Action, whose “Kool Aide” is one of my all-time favorite Brannon joints.

Anyway, this is what he looks like:

the Voice
The Voice

And this is the photo that made everyone familiar with both of us laugh out loud:

some dude
Some dude

See? Dumb joke.

The problem, of course, is I completely and totally (and I mean this sincerely) forgot about the phrase’s association with these guys:

RIP MCA
RIP MCA

In fairness, that (admittedly Grammy-nominated and very popular) song is on “To the Five Boroughs,” which I do not recall as an album with which I spent a whole lot of time. That said, I understand why SEVERAL people have said, “Oh, like the Beastie Boys song?”

No, not like the Beastie Boys song. And definately not like the John Cougar Mellencamp song. Never, ever that. Ever.

In sum, welcome to Check It Out. Watch this space.