Celebrate National Wine Day with our favorite TV wine lovers

E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/TNS

Someone has decided that today is National Wine Day. Until you can get home and bust out your favorite boxed vino to mark the occasion, let’s count down our favorite wine guzzlers on TV.

5. Hoda and Kathie Lee

Think mornings aren’t the right time for wine? The “Today” show ladies would beg to differ. The on-air personalities always have a glass of something in front of them, though they may not drink as much as you think.

4. Pretty much everyone who isn’t a child on “Big Little Lies”

Beautiful, rich people and their beautiful, rich problems — I’ll drink to that.

Nicole Kidman Laughing GIF by Big Little Lies - Find & Share on GIPHY

3. Olivia Pope on “Scandal”

Put on your favorite snuggly cardigan, pour a big glass of wine and pop some popcorn. Using a glass is optional.

Red Wine Drinking GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

2. Cersei on “Game of Thrones”

“Games of Thrones” returns to HBO July 16. Until then, you can watch the trailer that dropped this week — or practice your Cersei wine drinking skills.

1. Titus Andromedon on “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Season 3 of “Kimmy” hit Netflix earlier this month, but season 1’s song by Titus is still one of the highlights of the series. The song technically isn’t about wine, but actor Tituss Burgess does now have his own line of wines.

The writers of “Alias,” an ode to “Parks and Rec” and more coming to the ATX Television Festival

First season promo photo of "Alias" cast. We and they were so young.
First season promo photo of “Alias” cast. We and they were so young. Gotta love Bradley Cooper waaay in the back.

Remember “Alias,” the show that launched Jennifer Garner and creator J.J. Abrams, brought us Victor Garber as a concerned dad/CIA lifer, substituted someone called Milo Rambaldi for Leonardo da Vinci and acted as a fun allegory for how women have to do it all (grad student/maintain a relationship/ special agent)? Yes, that one.

The writers room, including Ken Olin, Lawrence Trilling, Sarah Caplan, Monica Breen and more, will reunite for the ATX Television Festival, it was announced today. No word as to whether Abrams will attend the fest, which will take place June 8-11.

WHO WILL PLAY LI'L SEBASTIAN?
WHO WILL PLAY LI’L SEBASTIAN?

This year’s community screening (which is open to badgeholders and non-badgeholders alike) will feature “Parks and Recreation.” It’s slated to take place June 9 at Hotel San Jose.  The event will include live music, food and drink and additional activities inspired by Pawnee’s annual Harvest Festival. (Will a miniature horse play Li’l Sebastian? One would hope.)

These panels and programs join such previously announced events as the “Designing Women” 30th anniversary reunion, a cast/creative reunion of the iconic series “Northern Exposure” and retrospectives for Linda Bloodworth-Thomason’s series “Evening Shade” and “Hearts Afire,”

Creator/executive producer Mara Brock Akil (“Being Mary Jane,” “The Game”), and “Sweet/Vicious” creator Jennifer Kaytin Robinson and showrunner Amanda Lasher will join this year’s lineup as first-time panelists for a variety of conversations, along with returning ATX advisory board members David Hudgins (“Shut Eye,” “Parenthood”), Liz Tigelaar (“Casual”), Graham Yost (“Sneaky Pete,” “Justified”), Michael Rauch (“Royal Pains”) and Kathleen McCaffrey (vice president of programming at HBO).

Advisory board member Glen Mazzara (“The Shield,” “The Walking Dead”) will present a panel titled “The Anti Hero: History of an American Myth,” an in-depth look at pop culture’s revered and reviled male anti-hero, from its origin in colonial storytelling to its well-documented presence in TV’s golden age and its current impact on society.

Paul Scheer (“Human Giant,” “The League”) will host a screening and panel conversation about the independent pilot process, discussing the intricacies and decisions behind the departure from the traditional “pitch, pilot, pick up” model.

Co-creator/executive producer Marta Kauffman will return to the festival with fellow Okay Goodnight! producers Robbie Rowe Tollin and Hannah K.S. Canter for a discussion with the creative team behind the original series “Grace & Frankie,” among other panels.

 

 

 

 

ATX Television Festival announces ‘Designing Women’ and ‘Northern Exposure’ reunions

The sixth ATX Television Festival, which takes place June 8-11, 2017, announced the first new panels and programming Thursday, including a 30th anniversary reunion of the sitcom “Designing Women,” and a cast and creatives reunion of the iconic drama “Northern Exposure.”

"Designing Women" cast photo, 1991
“Designing Women” cast photo, cir. 1991

The “Designing Women” reunion will feature creator Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, along with stars Delta Burke, Annie Potts, Jean Smart, Gerald McRaney, Hal Holbrook, and Douglas Barr. (Co-0star Meshach Taylor died in 2014.)

Cast members Rob Morrow, John Corbett, Barry Corbin, Janine Turner, and Darren Burrows (the latter of whom no longer looks anything like his character Ed Chigliak) are confirmed for the “Northern Exposure” reunion, along with creator Joshua Brand (“The Americans”), writers Robin Green and Mitchell Burgess (both created “Blue Bloods”) and network executive and producer Cheryl Bloch.

Retrospectives for Linda Bloodworth-Thomason’s other series, “Evening Shade” and “Hearts Afire,” will take place as well, with Burt Reynolds and Marilu Henner confirmed for “Evening Shade,” and Markie Post and Leslie Jordan confirmed for “Hearts Afire.”

“The Black Donnellys” and “The Middleman” will be part of the festival’s “cancelled too soon” track, with creators/EPs/directors Paul Haggis and Robert Moresco, writer Amanda Moresco, and cast member Jonathan Tucker confirmed for “The Black Donnellys,” and creator/EP Javier Grillo-Marxuach confirmed for “The Middleman,” along with star Natalie Morales.

Additional panelists will be announced at a later date.

ATX Advisory Board members Glen Mazzara (“Damien,” “The Shield,” “The Walking Dead”) and Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”) will also return as panelists.

Phil Rosenthal, creator/EP of “Everybody Loves Raymond” and “I’ll Have What Phil’s Having,” will return to ATX for another year to reprise his “I’ll Have What Phil’s Having…for Breakfast!” panel.

Mindy Kaling at the Texas Teen Book Festival: “I think I was just a friendly, chubby kid”

In case you missed it: on Saturday Mindy Kaling gave a one-on-one interview with Sarah Pitre of Alamo Drafthouse and Forever YA Book Club for the Texas Teen Book Festival, hosted by St. Edward’s University.

The writer and star of Hulu’s The Mindy Project talked about childhood influences, the start of her writing career, and her upcoming role in the film adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time, directed by Ava DuVernay. When asked to describe her teenage self as a YA protagonist, Kaling said that at fourteen years old, she was bookish, awkward, and an underdog.

“[I was] painfully shy, acneic, overweight–to the extent where you’re not worried about health but just shy of that,” Kaling listed. “I think I was just a friendly, chubby kid.”

Kaling also said she was ignored in school, which encouraged her writing abilities.

“I liked talking to people but was largely overlooked in school, so I found solace in books,” Kaling said. “I think fairly early on, when I was being ignored largely, I was left alone a lot because both my parents worked. You could either read or you could write. I think I always knew I wanted to write but it wasn’t until I was eight or nine years old that I learned that you could write for television.”

Kaling, who was at the festival promoting her books Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) and Why Not Me? said that when she was younger she started writing comedy skits for SNL.

“I was starting to write some short plays,” Kaling said. “I’ve realized that writing fiction felt, for me, so different, and so much harder than writing dialogue, which I’ve been doing for the past fifteen years. The reason I like writing essays so much is because I feel like I’m talking to a friend.”

When asked about the glamour of Hollywood, Kaling credited The Office for teaching her about the aesthetics of writing television shows.

“In order to find happiness for me, I just have to find situations where what is real is beautiful,” Kaling said. “In The Office, the most important thing is not everyone being beautiful. I like comedies where nobody cares about looks, where being funny is what’s most important.”

Kaling said that when she was a teenager, the book that affected her the most was House of Mirth by Edith Warton, and it still influences her writing choices today.

“I went through the whole Jane Austin canon, and then after that Charlotte Bronte, and then I read House of Mirth,” Kaling said. “In this book there was this lead who was stuck in her time, but also wanted selfish things and discovered her sexuality. Especially looking at all of these shows nowadays, that character’s still in my mind. I love flawed characters.”

Kaling also talked about her upbringing and how it influences her material.

“[My parents] were extremely strict but also very chatty. So I couldn’t go out or do a lot of things, but we’d sit inside and watch episodes of Seinfeld and talk a lot about why we liked them. Or we would listen to music on long car rides to Niagara Falls and talk about why it worked for us…people think the best quality in children is being expressive. In my house, it was much more important to be perceptive.”

“What is so cool is that the director, Ava DuVernay, has picked a really inclusive cast,” Kaling said. “And there’s a really interesting thing where she doesn’t want to say ‘diverse’, she thinks that’s a word that turns people off and doesn’t represent the same thing as ‘inclusive’, which I really agree with.”

When asked for more details about the movie, Kaling teased that the movie would be set in Los Angeles.

“If you’ve read the book, you know it takes place in England. If you’re not Caucasian, you feel like you love the book but you feel outside of it, like you’re admiring it in a really anthropological way,” Kaling said. “What’s great about [DuVernay’s] interpretation is just how inclusive it is.”

The Emmys: 20 thoughts on who was nominated, who should win and who was snubbed

  1. The nominations for the 68th Emmy Awards are out and, to the surprise of exactly nobody, “Game of Thrones” picked up 23 nods.
  2. The completely amazing “The People v. O.J. Simpson” picked up 22 noms,  “Fargo” has 18 and “Veep” has 17 nominations.
  3. It’s outstanding to see “The Americans” and “Mr. Robot,” the two smartest live action series on TV, given best drama nods. Even with the 23 nominations, I am not completely convinced “Game of Thrones” should be there for season five, which I found a little rambling (thought I thought this season was just stunningly entertaining). “Better Call Saul,” another best drama hopeful, is often brilliant. I would love to see either “The Americans” “or “Mr. Robot” win.
  4. Unlike the drama nods, nearly half of the best comedy nods – “Master of None” (Hulu), “Transparent” (Amazon) and “Unbreakable Kimmy Schimdt” (Netflix) – are streaming shows.
  5. Also in best comedy, the often excellent and usually family-friendly”Black-ish” (which my kids love) and “Modern Family” (which should be put out of its misery rather than be nominated again) are on ABC; “Silicon Valley” and “Veep,” both terrific, are on HBO.
    Rami Malek in 'Mr. Robot' (Peter Kramer/USA Network)
    Rami Malek in ‘Mr. Robot’ (Peter Kramer/USA Network)

     

  6. So much for comedy programming on CBS, Fox or NBC. Ouch.
  7. For my money, the lead actor in a drama Emmy should go to Rami Malek (“Mr Robot”) in a walk. His performance is like nothing else on television — complex, weird and 21st century.
  8. Matthew Rhys and his perma-frown are essential parts of what make “The Americans” great. Nominees Kyle Chandler, Bob Odenkirk, Liev Schreiber and Kevin Spacey are all excellent, but Malek and Rhys feel like something new.
  9. As far as actor in a comedy goes, Jeffrey Tambor is obviously brilliant in “Transparent, but he’s already feted (and the drama often works better than the comedy on that show).  As much as I like Anthony Anderson and Aziz Ansari, I am pulling for Thomas Middleditch’s note-perfect programmer on “Silicon Valley.” (I am mystified as to why T.J. Miller didn’t get a best supporting actor in a comedy nod for “Silicon Valley.” His bluster is brilliant.)
  10. The lead actress in a drama category is a game of inches: Keri Russell’s mission-first vibe on “The Americans” becomes more complicated by the second. (Also, will she ever stop doing laundry?) But Tatiana Maslany on “Orphan Black” is a tour de force, every episode, where, as various clones of her character, she is often playing three or four or five parts an episode. It’s nuts.
    In this image released by FX, Matthew Rhys, left, and Keri Russell appear in a scene from "The Americans." On Thursday, July 14, 2016, Rhys was nominated for outstanding actor in a drama series for his role in the series. The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be broadcast live on ABC beginning at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. (Craig Blankenhorn/FX via AP)
    Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell both got acting nods for “The Americans.” (Craig Blankenhorn/FX via AP)

     

  11. Lead actress in a comedy should probably go to Julia Louis-Dreyfus for “Veep,” but here’s the thing:
  12. Laurie Metcalfe should be a mortal lock not for HBO’s “Getting On,” the comedy for which she was nominated here, but for for her astounding turn in Louis CK’s genuinely groundbreaking “Horace and Pete,” which is very much not a comedy.
  13. The Playhouse-90-on-the-web format of “Horace and Pete” felt exciting and daring, one of the few times this past year that something appeared in front of your eyeballs that made anything seem possible.
  14. Metcalfe, who was terrific for years on “Roseanne,” also picked up a nomination for a guest spot on “The Big Bang Theory.” Three noms in three different acting categories is an Emmy first. She certainly deserves it.
  15. Interesting to see the total absence of David Simon’s HBO mini “Show Me A Hero” from the limited series category, whose nominees included the Austin-filmed “American Crime”; “Fargo,” from Austin’s Noah Hawley; “The Night Manager”; “The People vs. O.J. Simpson”; and the History Channel’s remake of “Roots.”
  16. As much as I loved “Fargo,” whose second season was cracklingly alive, my vote has to go to “The People vs. O.J. Simpson,” which managed to be dramatic, funny, timely, campy, dark and incredibly weird, often all at the same time.
  17. Speaking of, Courtney B. Vance should win lead actor in a movie or limited series for embodying but not copying Johnnie Cochran in “The People.” He is up against Cuba Gooding Jr. in this category as well.

    In this image released by FX, Sarah Paulson portrays Marcia Clark, left, and Sterling K. Brown portrays Christopher Darden in a scene from "The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story." On Thursday, July 14, 2016, Brown was nominated for outstanding supporting actor in a limited series or movie for his role. The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be broadcast live on ABC beginning at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. (Ray Mickshaw/FX via AP)
    Sarah Paulson portrays Marcia Clark, left, and Sterling K. Brown portrays Christopher Darden in a scene from “The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.”(Ray Mickshaw/FX via AP)
  18. I feel exactly the same way about Sarah Paulson as Marcia Clark in “The People.” In fact, it would be kind of great to see “The People” sweep the acting for limited series or movie.
  19. Most unjust snub? “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” one of the year’s breakout shows, wasn’t nominated for variety/talk, while “Jimmy Kimmel Live” and
  20. One sentimental favorite: I would love love love to see Jonathan Banks finally grab a supporting actor win for his incredible performance as Mike Ehrmantraut on “Better Call Saul,” a prize he should have won for the same character on “Breaking Bad.” 

The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards will be hosted by Jimmy Kimmel and broadcast live Sept. 18 on ABC. Check out a list of all the nominees from the most prominent categories.